thisistheverge:

I ate crickets because they’re the future of food
The morning after I visited Next Millennium Farms, my digestive system expelled its first cricket exoskeleton. There it was, floating on the water’s edge of my hotel room toilet: a translucent thoracic shell with three legs still attached. Presumably, the others got lost in the gastrointestinal shuffle, but I didn’t look long enough to try and spot them, or any of this particular insect’s friends and relatives. I had been eating a lot of them.

(Reblogged from thisistheverge)
(Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive)
While we all oppose terrorism, a more tempered, well-tailored response is needed than to write a blank check to the president for waging war in unknown places, against unknown adversaries, and at unknown costs.

One of the supportive letters written to Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Ca.) after she was the sole “no” vote in the overbroad Authorization of Use of Military Force (AUMF) in Afghanistan in 2001.

Lee received quite a lot of mail following her vote, some of it supportive, some angry but reasonable, and some super incoherent and racist (click here to see examples of all three categories—it’s a fascinating collection).

Lee’s concern that the AUMF would give the President “a blank check to attack an unspecified country, an unspecified enemy for an unspecified period of time” proved prescient; President Obama is now using that same AUMF to justify war on ISIS without congressional approval.

(via hipsterlibertarian)
(Reblogged from hipsterlibertarian)
(Reblogged from buzzfeedpolitics)
returntothestars:

It’s like when Windows does this, but in real life.

returntothestars:

It’s like when Windows does this, but in real life.

image

(Source: toska91)

(Reblogged from fuckyeahdementia)

deetzdk:

“Lessons from My 20s” is a 1200+ slide presentation from Hive Chairman Ryan Allis on everything he learned in his twenties on life, entrepreneurship, and the world.

http://hive.org/20s/

(Reblogged from deetzdk)
laboratoryequipment:

Smart Headlights Spare the Vision of Oncoming DriversA smart headlight developed at Carnegie Mellon Univ.’s Robotics Institute enables drivers to take full advantage of their high beams without fear of blinding oncoming drivers or suffering from the glare that can occur when driving in snow or rain at night.The programmable headlight senses and tracks virtually any number of oncoming drivers, blacking out only the small parts of the headlight beam that would otherwise shine into their eyes. During snow or rain showers, the headlight improves driver vision by tracking individual flakes and drops in the immediate vicinity of the car and blocking the narrow slivers of headlight beam that would otherwise illuminate the precipitation and reflect back into the driver’s eyes.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/smart-headlights-spare-vision-oncoming-drivers

laboratoryequipment:

Smart Headlights Spare the Vision of Oncoming Drivers

A smart headlight developed at Carnegie Mellon Univ.’s Robotics Institute enables drivers to take full advantage of their high beams without fear of blinding oncoming drivers or suffering from the glare that can occur when driving in snow or rain at night.

The programmable headlight senses and tracks virtually any number of oncoming drivers, blacking out only the small parts of the headlight beam that would otherwise shine into their eyes. During snow or rain showers, the headlight improves driver vision by tracking individual flakes and drops in the immediate vicinity of the car and blocking the narrow slivers of headlight beam that would otherwise illuminate the precipitation and reflect back into the driver’s eyes.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/smart-headlights-spare-vision-oncoming-drivers

(Reblogged from laboratoryequipment)
(Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive)

mothernaturenetwork:

Photo of the day: Cuddly tiger cub goofs around with mom
Indira, a white Bengal tiger, cuddles with one of her three cubs on Feb. 6 at the zoo in Cali, Colombia. Born on Nov. 30, the adorable triplets do not possess the same recessive white-striped gene as their mother

(Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork)
(Reblogged from science-junkie)